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Alfred C. Proulx
Captain, United States Navy
Alfred C. Proulx, died October 29, 1998 at Arlington (Virginia) Hospital, of cardiac arrest, at 83.

Retired Captain Alfred C. Proulx, United States Navy Reserve, had served as first clerk of the U.S. Court of Military Appeals, from 1951 until 1972. Previously, he had worked nine years for the Federal Register, serving first as chief attorney and then as acting deputy director. At the start of his career, Mr. Proulx had been a technical supervisor for the Works Project Administration with the National Archives. He had also worked as a junior archivist at the War Department Archives.

During World War II, Captain Proulx served as an executive aide to the Judge Advocate General for the Navy.

He was a 1936 graduate of Holy Cross Uiversity.

After leaving active duty in 1946, he began his career with the Naval Reserve, retiring as a Captain in 1975.

Captain Proulx is survived by a son; two daughters; a sister; a brother, William, M.D., Holy Cross 1938; nine grandchildren; and 11 great-grandchildren.  He is buried in Section 7-A of Arlington National Cemetery.


UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE ARMED FORCES
DAILY JOURNAL
NOVEMBER 18, 1998
MOMENT OF SILENCE

At the beginning of Court hearings this morning Chief Judge Walter T. Cox III asked all present to observe a moment of silence in memory of Alfred C. Proulx, the first Clerk of this Court, who was appointed in July 1951 and served with distinction in that position until his retirement in June 1972. Mr. Proulx provided inspirational guidance to this Court during its creation and development. His years of leadership built a firm foundation for the Courtís future growth.


AC Prolulx Gravesite PHOTO
Photo By Michael Robert Patterson, 1999

AC Proulx Gravesite PHOTO
Photo By M. R. Patterson, October 2002

Webmaster: Michael Robert Patterson


Posted: 2 January 2000 Updated: 7 October 2002 Updated: 31 May 2003 Updated: 9 August 2003 Updated: 6 January 2007

AC Proulx Gravesite PHOTO June 2003
Photo By M. R. Patterson, 28 June 2003