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Arthur H. Dutton
Colonel, United States Army
Connecticut State Flag
His private memorial in Section 1 of Arlington National Cemetery reads:

Engineer Corps, United States Army.
Colonel of the 21st Connecticut Volunteers.
Died June 5, 1864, of wounds received on May 26 while landing 
ammunition before Petersburg, Virginia, aged 25 years.
1838-1864."


Arthur Henry Dutton, soldier, born in Wallingford, Connecticut, 15 November 1838; died in Baltimore, Maryland, 5 June 1864. He was graduated at West Point in the engineer corps in 1861. He served on the staff of General Mansfield in Washington at the beginning of the war, and then had charge of the defenses of Fernandina, Fla., until he became colonel of the 21st Connecticut regiment on 5 September 1862. While on duty in North Carolina with his regiment, he served as chief of staff to Maj.-Gen. Peck, and subsequently held a similar position upon the staff of Major-Gen. W. F. Smith. After the battle of Drury's Bluff, in which he greatly distinguished himself, he was placed in command of the 3d brigade. While reconnoitering with his brigade in the neighborhood of Bermuda Hundred on 5 June 1864, he came upon the enemy strongly entrenched and almost hidden from view. Being, as usual, on the skirmish line, he was mortally wounded in the beginning of the engagement.

On the 25th of May, Colonel Dutton, commanding the brigade, received orders to reconnoiter the left of the enemy’s position, and designated the 21st as the regiment for the work, but night coming on he returned the regiment to its camp. On the day following, the 26th, Colonel Dutton, with the brigade, again moved, with
orders to push the reconnaissance until stopped by the enemy. After an advance of nearly two miles the enemy was found strongly entrenched. Line of battle was at once formed, but as the skirmishers were becoming engaged, Colonel Dutton, who was then, as usual, on the skirmish line, was mortally wounded. The command devolved upon Lieut.-Colonel Burpee, who was finally obliged to withdraw his command.

Major Crosby, in his report, speaks of the death of Colonel Dutton as follows: Colonel Dutton dies from the effects of his wounds June 5th. He graduated at West Point in 1861, Kilpatrick, Custar, O’Rourke, Benjamin, and Farquhar being among his classmates. “Bold and chivalrous, with a nice sense of honor, a judgment quick and decisive, an unwavering zeal in his chosen profession, he was in every respect a thorough soldier. By his companions in arms he will never be forgotten, and to them his last resting place will be as a shrine commemorating the friendships which not the rude shock of war, nor lapse of time, can blight or destroy.”


AH Dutton Gravesite PHOTO

AH Dutton Gravesite PHOTO
Photos By M. R. Patterson, October 2002


Updated: 18 August 2001  Updated: 7 October 2002 Updated: 5 March 2003  Updated: 13 July 2003  Updated: 8 April 2005

AH Dutton Gravesite PHOTO June 2003

AH Dutton Gravesite PHOTO June 2003
Photos By M. R. Patterson, 28 June 2003