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Alfred Winslow Harmon
Commander, United States Navy
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From a contemporary press report:

Alfred Winslow Harmon, 81, a retired Navy commander who served in the Pacific during World War II, died of congestive heart failure June 21, 1998 at Arleigh Burke Pavilion in McLean, Virginia.

Commander Harmon served 30 years in the Navy before retiring in 1970. He was aboard the battleship Pennsylvania when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor in 1941, bringing the United States into World War II, and he later served with amphibious forces in the Pacific.

During the Korean War, he served on the cruiser St. Paul, and he directed gunfire against enemy positions. Later, he served in Europe and commanded the destroyer Soley, which participated in the naval blockade of Cuba during the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis. He attended the Naval War College and graduated from George Washington University, where he also took a master's degree in business administration.

He settled in McLean 34 years ago.

He was born in Cherryvale, Kansas.

In retirement, he traveled extensively and tended his garden.

Survivors include his wife of 51 years, Dorothy Stillman Harmon of McLean; a son, Paul Winslow Harmon of Fairfax; a sister; a brother; and one granddaughter. A son, Sidney J. Harmon II, died in 1991.


HARMON, ALFRED W., CMDR, USN (Ret.) 

On Sunday, June 21, 1998, at Arleigh-Burke Pavillion, ALFRED W. HARMON, CMDR, USN (ret.), of McLean, VA, beloved husband of Dorothy Harmon; beloved father of Paul W. Harmon of Fairfax, VA and the late Sidney J. Harmon, II; brother of Ann H. Matthews of San Francisco, CA and James S. Harmon of Atlanta, GA; grandfather of Erika Harmon of Alexandria, VA. Funeral services will be held on Wednesday, July 15 at 11 a.m. at Ft. Myer Chapel with full military honors. Interment to follow in Arlington National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers the family suggests contributions be made to the American Cancer Society or to the Hospice of Northern VA.


Updated: 16 February 2003  Updated: 27 August 2005
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