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Daniel Webster Flagler
Brigadier General, United States Army
New York State Flag
Courtesy of the United States Army Ordnance Hall of Fame:

Brigadier General Daniel W. Flagler was born in 1835 in Lockport, New York.  Graduating from the United  States Military Academy in 1861,  he served brilliantly in a military career that spanned over 38 years.

General Flagler was cited many times for his distinguished and meritorious services during the Civil War.

Between the years of 1861 and 1865, he was promoted from Lieutenant to Brevet Lieutenant Colonel.  Serving in several different positions during the war, his most significant was that of Chief of Ordnance, Army of the Potomac.

In the post-Civil War era, he continued to carry out many challenging assignments but was returned to his permanent rank. When he assumed command of Rock Island Arsenal, Illinois, in June 1871, he was only a Captain. For 15 years, he was totally devoted to the development of the arsenal. During those years, he supervised as well as developed the completion of a fire station, numerous manufacturing shops, a powerplant, the Moline Bridge, the arsenal railroad, as well as a hot water/power system.  High Army officials of that day credited him with supervising a difficult job of construction.  His meticulous attention to detail is reflected today in the graceful lines of many of his buildings, which have stood for more than a hundred years.

In 1891, General Flagler assumed the post of Chief of Ordnance, the command at which he died on active duty on March 29, 1899.


Daniel Webster Flagler of New York
Appointed from New York, Cadet, United States Military Academy, 1 July 1867
Second Lieutenant and Second Lieutenant of Ordnance, 24 June 1861
First Lieutenant, 3 August 1861
Captain, 3 March 1863
Major, 23 June 1874
Lieutenant Colonel, 23 August 1881
Colonel, 15 September 1890
Brigadier General, Chief of Ordnance, United States Army, 23 January 1891
Breveted Captain, 14 March 1862 for gallant and meritorious service in the battle of Newbern, North Carolina; Major, 26 April 1862 for gallant and meritorious service in the siege of Fort Macon, North Carolina; and Lieutenant Colonel, 13 March 1865 for distinguished service in the field and faithful service in the Ordnance Department during the war.

General Flagler died on 29 March 1899 and was buried in Section 1 of Arlington National Cemetery.  His son, Clement Alexander Finley Flagler, is buried with him.


GENERAL D. W. FLAGLER IS DEAD
Chief of Ordnance of the Army Passes Away at Old Point Comfort
His Long Service

NEWPORT NEWS, March 29, 1899 – Brigadier General D. W. Flagler, Chief of Ordnance, United States Army, died today.  After many weeks of suffering from rheumatism, which recently developed acute and distressing phases, General Flagler passes away this afternoon at the Hygeia Hotel, at Old Point, whiter he came three weeks ago by advice of his physician.  The General’s wife and daughter were at his bedside during the last hours.  The body will be removed to Washington tomorrow afternoon.

General Flagler was born in New York and was appointed to the Military Academy from this State July 1, 1856.  He was graduated number five in the class of 1861, and was appointed Second Lieutenant of Ordnance.  He served with credit throughout the War Between the States.  His earliest military service was in connection with the drilling of volunteers at Washington, after which he acted as aide-de-camp to Colonel Hunter in the Manassas Campaign, being engaged in the first battle of Bull Run. He was afterward aide-de-camp to General McDowell in the defenses of Washington. After a short service as Ordnance Officer at the Alleghany Arsenal, Pennsylvania, he accompanied General Burnside’s expedition to North Carolina, as Chief of Ordnance, and was engaged in the battle and capture of Roanoke Island, also in the attack of Newburn, North Carolina, the capture of Fort Macon, the Maryland campaign with the Army of the Potomac, in the battle of South Mountain, battle of Antietam, the battle of Fredericksburg, the battle of Chancellorsville, and the battle of Gettysburg.  In October 1863, h was assigned to inspection duty at the West Point Foundry and remained there until May 1864 when he was transferred to duty in the Ordnance Officer at Washington where he served until June 1865.  He was brevetted three timed for gallant services at the battles of Antietam, second as Major, for meritorious services for the siege of Fort Macon and third as Lieutenant Colonel, for distinguished services in the field and faithful and meritorious services in the Ordnance Department during the war.

Since the war he has served at various stations on ordnance duty, and has rendered most important service in the development of the Ordnance Department of the Army.  He has served consecutively at Waltervliet Arsenal, New York; Augusta Arsenal, Georgia; Rock Island Arsenal, Illinois; Fort Monroe Arsenal, Virginia; Fort Union Arsenal, New Mexico; San Antonio Arsenal, Texas; Frankford Arsenal, Pennsylvania; and Watertown Arsenal, Massachusetts.  He reached the grade of Lieutenant Colonel in September 1890.  While in command of Watertown Arsenal in January 1891 he was promoted to Brigadier General and Chief of Ordnance, and has since served in that capacity which conspicuous success.  He was one of the most popular officers in the Army.


FLAGLER, D W
BRIG GEN CHIEF OF ORD USA
VETERAN SERVICE DATES: Unknown
DATE OF DEATH: 03/25/1899
DATE OF INTERMENT: Unknown
BURIED AT:   SITE LOT 147
ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY

FLAGLER, D W W/O
DATE OF DEATH: 09/06/1907
DATE OF INTERMENT: Unknown
BURIED AT:   SITE 147
ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY
 WIFE OF DW FLAGLER - BRIG GEN ORD DEPT

Webmaster: Michael Robert Patterson


Posted: 25 July 2003  Updated: 14 March 2004 Updated:29 September 2004  Updated: 28 July 2005 Updated: 25 January 2008
US Military Academy (West Point) SEAL
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

DW Flagler Gravesite PHOTO June 2003
Photo By M. R. Patterson, 28 June 2003