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George Hamilton Cameron
Major General, United States Army
Illinois State Flag
Cameron, George Hamilton Cameron, Illinois

Appointed from Illinois as a Cadet, United States Military Academy, 1 July 1879 (29). Commissioned a Second Lieutenant, 7th United States Cavalry 13 June 1883; First Lieutenant 4th United States Cavalry, 9 March 1891; Captain, 2 March 1899.

Nina Dean Tilford Cameron was born at St. Louis, Missouri, 5 December 1864. She died 19 April 1960 at Darlington, Maryland, and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery. She was a member of the Colonial Dames, through George Taylor, Virgina House of Burgesses, and a Daughter of 1812, through Captain James Dean, then Adjutant, 3rd U.S. Infantry. They were married 22 May 1888 at Fort Meade, South Dakota.


Douglass Tilford Cameron, First Lieutenant, United States Army, who was killed in action in World War I, was the General's son.  Note the Lieutenant's middle name and the General's wife's maiden name, each being "Tilford."

Based on research by Michael T. Stein, Douglass Tilford Cameron WAS indeed the General's son. To wit:  "Who's who in America (regarding General Cameron) states: George H. Cameron married Nina Dean on May 22nd, 1888 Children: Douglas Tilford (Lieutenant, United States Army killed-in-action, France November 3rd, 1918) Nina Tilford (wife of Brigadier General John B. Thompson) Margaret Hughes (wife of Lieutenant Colonel Buckner M. Creel)."

CAMERON, DOUGLAS T
1ST LT BATTY D 7TH F A 1ST DIV
VETERAN SERVICE DATES: Unknown
DATE OF DEATH: 11/03/1918
DATE OF INTERMENT: 03/25/1921
BURIED AT: SECTION E N  SITE 1205
ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY


NOTE: General Cameron's father-in-law, Joseph Green Tilford, Brigadier General, United States Army and his wife, Cornelia Van Ness Tilford, are also buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

Also buried in Arlington National Cemetery are the General's daughter and son-in-law (John Bellinger Thompson, Brigadier General, United States Army, and Nina Cameron Thompson).



Attached are two pictures, one of Major General George Hamilton Cameron, and one of his medals. I was fortunate to inherit both from my father George Cameron Creel, grandson of the man memorialized on your web page.

Your site correctly asserts that my grandmother's brother, Douglass Tilford Cameron, was killed in action in World War I.

I submit both for your nformation, but of course, our family would be greatly honored if you wished to add either to the webpage.

Marty Creel, July 2005


MARRIED AN ARMY OFFICER

STURGIS, Dakota, May 24, 1888 – George H. Cameron, Lieutenant of the Seventh Cavalry and Miss Nina D. Tilford were married last evening by the Rev. Father Metzger of Sturgis at the bride’s home at Fort Meade.  The affair was the social event of the season.  Lieutenant Cameron is engaged at West Point, New York, and the bride is the daughter of Lieutenant Colonel J. G. Tilford of the Seventh Cavalry., commander of Fort Meade.

Guests were present from New York, New Orleans, Chicago, Omaha, Rock Island and numerous other places.  The bride and groom were supported by Captain McCreery, M.D. and Miss Mamie Fitch of Omaha, Captain Nowland and Miss Alexander, Lieutenant Rice and Miss Jennie Wilson, Colonel Bacon and Miss Lela Alexander and Miss Medora Crew as maid of honor.

The residence was decorated with plants and flowers, and over the happy couple was suspended a beautiful floral bail.  After the ceremony a collation was served, at the conclusion of which the guests whiles away the hours in dancing. The groom and groomsmen were attired in their full dress uniforms.  The bride was attired in shale satin, out décolleté, en train and veil and trimmed with orange blossoms.  The bridesmaids wore dresses of white trimmed with yellow.  The bridal party left today by special car for an extended trip through the South and East, at the termination of which they will take up their residence at the groom’s post at West Point.


GENERAL G. H. CAMERON, LED FIFTH CORPS
Commander in the First World War Dies
In St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne Drives

STAUTON, Virginia, January 28, 1944 – Major General George H. Cameron, USA, retired, commanded of the Fifth Corps during the St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne offensives in World War I, died here today.  His age was 83.

He was born in Ottawa, Illinois, and was graduated in 1883 from the United States Military Academy after which he served in the Philippines and assisted in organizing the Fort Riley, Kansas, Cavalry School.

In 1917 General Cameron was made a Major General and went to Camp Greene, North Carolina, as commander of the Fourth Division.  He went from there to France.  He retired in 1924, making his home at Fishers Island, New York, until be moved here recently.

A funeral service will be held in the Arlington National Cemetery at 10 A.M. Monday.
 
 

 Webmaster: Michael Robert Patterson

GH Cameron Portrait

GH Cameron Medals



Courtesy of Michael T. Stein:

Major General George Hamilton Cameron
Born January 8, 1861
Died January 28, 1944

Second Lieutenant 1883
First Lieutenant 1891
Captain 1899
Major 1909
Lieutenant Colonel 1914
Brigadier General (National Army) 1917
Major General (National Army) 1917
Colonel, United States Army 1919
Served with 7th Cavalry Regiment 1883-91
Served with 4th Cavalry Regiment 1891-.
Instructor, U. S. Military Academy 1888-95
Secretary, School of Application, Cavalry & Field Artillery, Ft. Riley 1901-06
Secretary & Assistant Commandant, Mounted Service School 1907-10
Served in the Philippines 1910-12 With the 12th U. S. Cavalry Regiment
Commander, Big Bend District, Texas 1913
Student, Army War College 1913-14
Director, Army War College 1914-16
Commanding Officer, 5th Cavalry Regiment 1916-17
Commanding Officer, 3rd Brigade, Provisional Cavalry Division 1917
Commanding Officer, 25th Cavalry Regiment 1917
Commanding General, 78th Infantry Brigade 1917
Commanding General, 40th Division 1917-18
Commanding General, V US. Corps 1918
Commander, Camp Gordon 1918-19
Commandant, Cavalry School 1919-21
Chief of Staff, 76th Division (Reserve) 1921-24
Retired 1924


On November 19, 1917, the same year that America entered World War I, the 4th Infantry Division was formed at Camp Greene, North Carolina to begin its long tradition of service to our country. Filled with draftees, the Fourth Division, whose insignia had been adopted by its first commanding general, Major General George H. Cameron, became known as the "Ivy" division. Its insignia consisted of four green ivy leaves joined at the stem and opening at the four corners of a square on a khaki background. The Division also derived its numerical designation from the Roman numeral IV, (4 and IV mean the same thing) hence the nickname "Ivy" division. Also, in the language of flowers, ivy means "Steadfast and Loyal" - the division's motto.

In April 1918, the Ivy Division's Doughboys embarked aboard a number of ships - all 29,180 officers and men - enroute to fight in France. The first casualties of the division were suffered as the ship carrying men of the 58th Infantry Regiment was hit by a German torpedo, killing 56 men. After a brief layover in England, the Ivy division landed at Calais, Bordeaux, and Brest enroute to the front lines. By mid-June the mighty Aisne-Marne campaign was shaping up and the Ivy Doughboys were sent to bolster the French 6th Army. Unbeknownst to the men of the Division, their movements were beginning to create a historic precedent and by the time the "great war" would end some months hence, the Ivy Division would serve with distinction - as the only American combat force - with both the French and the British in their respective sectors. When the war ended on November 11, 1918, the Ivy Division had earned battle streamers with the names of Aisne Marne, St. Mihiel, Meuse Argonne, and Defensive Sector emblazoned on them. A price had been paid - 69 officers and 2,000 men killed in action and total casualties of killed and wounded added up to 499 officers and 13,150 men. The Ivy Division had fought and defeated sixteen enemy divisions. Nine days after the end of the war, the Fourth Division marched into Germany to undertake occupation duties; and it wasn't until August 1919 that the Ivy Division's Doughboys returned to the United States. France had been the Division's first battlefield. A generation later, a new breed of Ivy Division soldiers would again fight in France.

CAMERON, GEORGE H
MAJOR GENE US ARMY RETD
VETERAN SERVICE DATES: Unknown
DATE OF DEATH: 01/28/1944
DATE OF INTERMENT: 01/31/1944
BURIED AT: SECTION 6  SITE 5700
ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY

CAMERON, NINA T WID/O GEORGE H
DATE OF BIRTH: 12/05/1864
DATE OF DEATH: 04/19/1960
DATE OF INTERMENT: 04/22/1960
BURIED AT: SECTION 6  SITE 5700 NH
ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY
 WIFE OF GH CAMERON - M/GEN USA


GC Cameron Gravesite PHOTO
Photo By Michael Robert Patterson, 1999

Posted: 22 December 2001 Updated: 2 January 2002 Updated: 24 July 2002 Updated: 22 February 2003 Updated: 27 July 2003  Updated: 31 August 2003 Updated: 3 May 2004  Updated: 4 September 2004 Updated: 16 July 2005  Updated: 14 September 2005 Updated: 22 November 2005
Updated: 16 October 2007 Updated: 23 January 2008
US Military Academy (West Point) SEAL
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

4th Division Patch
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Nina Tilford Cameron With Libby Custer PHOTO
Nina Tilford Cameron as a young girl, sitting on the lap of
Libby Custer, wife of Brevet Major General George Armstrong Custer.
(Photo Courtesy of Richard Tilford)

NINA TILFORD CAMERON PHOTO

Nina Tilford & Captain Weir

Nina Tilford & Captain Weir
Nina Dean Tilford Cameron With Captain Thomas B. Weir, 7th U. S. Cavalry
Photo courtesy of Richard Tilford

Merrill & Tilford Daughters On The Western Frontier
Nina Dean Tilford (Cameron), right, with the daughter of Major Lewis Merrill

GH Cameron Gravesite PHOTO October 2007
Photo By: M. R. Patterson, October 2007

GH Cameron Gravesite PHOTO
Photo By M. R. Patterson, 22 April 2004

GH Cameron Gravesite PHOTO

GH Cameron Gravesite PHOTO
Photos By M. R. Patterson, 2 December 2004