ANC Website Top BANNER 2
Gerald Mauk
Colonel, United States Army
Colorado State Flag
Gerald Mauk, 63, a retired Army colonel and former marketing manager with the Boeing Corp. in Arlington, died of lung cancer September 12, 1998 at Inova Fairfax Hospital. A Washington area resident for 15 years, he lived in Burke, Virginia.

Colonel Mauk joined the Army in 1959 and was an intelligence officer in this country and abroad.

His overseas assignments included a tour in Vietnam during the war there.

After retiring from active duty in 1984, he worked for Boeing until retiring again in 1995.

His military decorations included the Legion of Merit, the Bronze Star and the Meritorious Service Medal.

Colonel Mauk, a Denver native, was a graduate of Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington. He received a master's degree in management from George Washington University and a master's degree in military science from the Army Command and Staff College.

He was a member of the American Legion, the Retired Officers Association, the Military Intelligence Association, and the Association of the U.S. Army.

Survivors include his wife, Marilyn, of Burke; four sons, Joseph, of Minneapolis, Steve, of Centreville, John, of Alexandria and James, of Burke; a daughter, Malia Mauk of Alexandria; two sisters, Marge Twohy of Salinas, Calif., and Kathleen Reid of Redlands, Calif.; and a grandchild.


MAUK, GERALD F., COL, USA (Ret.)

On September 12, 1998, beloved husband of Marilyn L. Mauk; devoted father of Joseph F., Steven M., John E., Malia R. and James T. Mauk. Also survived by his grandson, Sean J. Mauk; and his sisters, Marge Twohy and Kathleen Reid. A Mass of Christian Burial will be offered on Wednesday at 12 Noon in the Church of the Nativity of Our Lord, 6400 Nativity Lane, Burke, VA. Interment to follow in Arlington National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in his name to Hospice of Northern Virginia.


Page Updated: 25 October 2000 Updated:20 November 2005
Legion of Merit
 

Bronze Star Medal
 

American Memory