ANC Website Top BANNER 2
Harry Albert Flint
Colonel, United States Army
Vermont State Flag
COLONEL H. A. FLINT KILLED - BURIED IN NORMANDY

LONDON, August 10, 1944 - Colonel Harry A. "Paddy" Flint who accepted the surrender of German military and naval commanders at Cherbourg, was buried on July 26 in a military cemetery near Ste. Mere Eglise in Normandy, it was announced today.

He died of wounds received the day before. The 56-year-old Colonel was famed in the United States Cavalry as the man who "came back."  In 1940 he was injured and lost his sight and speech for ten days.  Fully recovered, he escaped enforced retirement in 1941 when combat officers over 45 were being let out of the Army.

A graduate of West Point in 1912, he came to Britain in 1942 in the Services of Supply.  He met Lieutenant General George S. Patton, Jr. in London and convinced his old friend to take him to North Africa. A supply officer in North Africa at first, Colonel Flint later commanded the Fifty-sixth Armored Infantry Regiment and then an Infantry Regiment.  He  fought through the Sicilian Campaign and won the D.S.O. and the Silver Star with Clusters.

Colonel Flint was born in Vermont. In World War I he served in the Cavalry and the Field Artillery.


August 21, 1944:

There was no doubt about it—at 56, cavalry-trained Colonel Harry A. Flint was overage to command infantry in battle. Yet there he was, in France, a happy dust-caked fugitive from half a dozen cushy supply and liaison jobs that were always threatening to keep him out of combat.

In France, as in North Africa and Sicily, "Paddy" Flint's aging, horse-bowed legs sometimes let him down in battle. When they did he would sit down for a spell. His men knew, and they loved him for his nerve. It was soldier's talk that "Ike" Eisenhower, a West Point plebe when the Colonel was a first-classman, had something to do with keeping Paddy up front. The arrangement suited old Paddy right down to the ground. France, beamed the ruddy Colonel, was his "graduation exercise" as a footslogger.

On the Saint-Lô-Périers road, Paddy's outfit was held up by heavy mortar fire. Up front, as usual, the Colonel and a rifle patrol soon found the trouble. Said Paddy over the walkie-talkie: "Have spotted pillbox. Will start them cooking."

He called for a tank, rode atop it in a rain of fire as it sprayed the hedgerows. The tank driver was wounded. Paddy crawled down, went forward afoot. A sniper's bullet got him as he led his patrol into the shelter of a farmhouse.

Aid men soon came up, loaded the Colonel on a stretcher. Said a Private as they started to the rear: "Remember, Paddy, you can't kill an Irishman—you can only make him mad." Colonel Flint smiled. Next day he died.


Colonel Harry A. Flint, Commanding Officer of the 39th Infantry Regiment, died of his combat wounds on 24 July 1944.


Courtesy of the Home of Heroes.Com

FLINT, HARRY A. (KIA)
Headquarters, Seventh U.S. Army, General Orders No. 25 (1943)
(First Award)

Synopsis:

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Harry A. Flint (0-3377), Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy in action against enemy forces in August 1943.

Colonel Flint's outstanding leadership, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty at the cost of his life, exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.


*FLINT, HARRY A. (KIA)
Headquarters, First U.S. Army, General Orders No. 75 (1944)
(Second Award)

Synopsis:

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Harry A. Flint (0-3377), Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving with the 39th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division, in action against enemy forces on 24 July 1944.

Colonel Flint's outstanding leadership, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty at the cost of his life, exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, the 9th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.


FLINT, HARRY ALBERT
COL AGF 39TH INF REGT 9TH INF DIV USA
DATE OF DEATH: 7/24/1944
BURIED AT: SECTION 2  SITE 310
ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY

FLINT, SALLIE M WIDOW OF HARRY A
DATE OF BIRTH: 08/16/1886
DATE OF DEATH: 12/05/1968
BURIED AT: SECTION 2  SITE E-310 WH
ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY


Posted: 14 May 2005 Updated: 25 August 2007 Updated: 18 March 2009
US Military Academy (West Point) SEAL
 
 
 
 
 
 

Distinguished Service Cross - 2 awards
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

     Silver Star Medal - 3 awards
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Purple Heart Medal