United States Army Air Crew – Killed In Vietnam: 12 June 1968

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Warrant Officer Carter was the aircraft commander of a UH-1D helicopter lost during a command and control mission over Quang Nai Province, South Vietnam, on June 13, 1968. Warrant Officer Johnson, Specialist 4 Milton, and Private First Class Weamer were crewmembers on the helicopter; and Lieutenant Colonel Barker, Captain Michles, and First Lieutenant Phillips were passengers.

Individually identified remains for Warrant Officer Carter and Lieutenant Colonel Barker will be returned from Hawaii, as well as group remains which include all seven servicemen. These remains were recovered and repatriated on June 8, 1993 and October 5, 1993 as the result of joint U.S.- Vietnamese survey and excavation activities.

Previously located remains for each serviceman, except Warrant Officer Carter, were recovered, individually identified and repatriated in 1968.


Captain Michles had served his first 6 months as a Company Commander and was moved to the position of S-2. On the morning of 13 June 1968 Co A 4-3 Infantry had come in contact with an unknown sized enemy force in the Batangin area vicinity My Lai. Colonel Barker, the battalion commander along with Captain Michles and the the Battalion Forward observer left the fire base at Lz Dottie via helicopter to coordinate Co A's mission when the helicopter was “cut-in-half” by an air force FAC who was working in the adjoing AO with the ARVN's. After firing a marking rocket to mark enemy positions for the ARVN unit the plane ran into Colonel Barkers C&C ship which was hovering over co A's position. Colonel Barker, Captain Michles, Lieutenant Phillips and the helicopter crew were all killed.

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Frank Akeley Barker, Jr. was born on January 26, 1928 and joined the Armed Forces while in New Haven, Connecticut.

He served in the United States Army and in 18 years of service, he attained the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.

On June 13, 1968, at the age of 40, Frank Akeley Barker, Jr.  perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Quang Ngai.

NOTE: Colonel Barker was the Battalion Commander at the My-Lai “Massacre,” but was killed before the incident was made public.

On 16 March 1968, at about 0800, soldiers of Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 20th Infantry of the Americal Division assaulted a hamlet in South Vietnam's Quang Ngai Province called by the Vietnamese Thuan Yen but known to the Americans as My Lai 4. On this morning, Charlie company was part of a temporarily assembled strike force called Task Force (TF) Barker, named for its commander Lieutenant Colonel Frank Barker. The mission of TF Barker was to locate and destroy Vietcong main-force combat units in an area on the coast of the South China Sea known to be a VC political and military stronghold. The company met no resistance as it assaulted the hamlet, but by noon every living thing in My Lai that the troops could find—men, women, children, and livestock—was dead.

According to South and North Vietnamese sources, 504 civilians were killed in and around My Lai. Charlie Company suffered one casualty, the result of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the foot. The company's after-action report claimed 128 enemy killed and three weapons recovered.

For over a year, the event lay dormant, but after a letter was sent to the Army and members of Congress by a recently-discharged soldier, the Army began an investigation and Seymour Hersh broke the story in the press. A number of soldiers from Charlie company were charged with murder. All were acquitted or had their charges dropped except for Lieutenant William Calley, a Charlie Company platoon commander, who was convicted of premeditated murder by a court martial and sentenced to life imprisonment. After various reviews and appeals, he served only four and a half months. Twelve officers were accused of covering up the incident. Only one was tried by court-martial, and he was acquitted.

James Devrin Carter
Chief Warrant Officer, United States Army

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James Devrin Carter was born on March 13, 1947 and joined the Armed Forces while in Clarkstown, Michigan.

He served in the United States Army and in one year of  service, he attained the rank of Chief Warrant Officer 1.

James Devrin Carter is listed as Missing in Action and decalred dead as of 13 June 1968.

Jerry Hampton Johnson

Chief Warrant Office, United States Army

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Earl R. Michles was born on September 22, 1938 and joined the Armed Forces while in Pocahontas, Arkansas.

He served in the United States Army and in six years of service, he attained the rank of Captain.

On June 13, 1968, at the age of 29, Earl R. Michles perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Quang Ngai.

He was awarded the Silver Star Medal and the Purple Heart Medal.

Michael Leon Phillips

First Lieutenant, United States Army

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Michael Leon Phillips was born on March 9, 1943 and joined the Armed Forces while in Washington, DC.

He served in the United States Army and in two years of  service, he attained the rank of  First Lieutenant.

On June 13, 1968, at the age of 25, Michael Leon Phillips perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Quang Ngai.

Gary Andrew Milton

Specialist 4th, United States Army

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Gary Andrew Milton was born on March 20, 1947 and joined the Armed Forces while in Hartley, Texas.

He served in the United States Army  and in one year of service, he attained the rank of Specialist 4th Class.

On June 13, 1968, at the age of 21, Gary Andrew Milton perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Quang Ngai.

Allen R. Weamer

Private First Class, United States Army

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Allen Ray Weamer was born on December 31, 1948 and joined the Armed Forces while in Tacoma, Washington.

He served in the United States Army, Battalion 14TH CAB, and in one year of service, he attained the rank of Private First Class.

On June 13, 1968, at the age of 19, Allen Ray Weamer perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Quang Ngai.

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